John Franklin Vaughn 

John Franklin Vaughn

Male 1841 - 1862  Share Photo / DocumentShare Photo / Document

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  • Birth  14 Apr 1841  TN Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender  Male 
    Census  1850  Lincoln County, TN Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Census  1860  Tishomingo Co., MS Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died  23 Apr 1862  Okolona Hospital - MS Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried  Okolona Confederate Cemetery, Okolona, Chicasaw Co, MS Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Age  21 years 
    Person ID  I340  Extended Families of Childress
    Last Modified  29 Mar 2014 

    Father  George Washington Vaughan,   b. 15 Jun 1820, Hawkins Co., TN Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1901, Tishomingo Co., MS Find all individuals with events at this location   (80 years)  
    Mother  Mary Jane Brown,   b. 22 May 1818,   d. 30 Jan 1901, Tishomingo Co., MS Find all individuals with events at this location   (82 years) 
    Married  25 Jun 1840  Hawkins Co., TN Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID  F83  Group Sheet

  • Event Map
    Event
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 1850 - Lincoln County, TN Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 1860 - Tishomingo Co., MS Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Maps 
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Documents
    1860 US Census - MS - Tishomingo County
    1860 US Census - MS - Tishomingo County
    Family of George Washington Vaughn
    John F Vaughn
    John F Vaughn
    Publication Number: M269
    NARA M269. Compiled service records of Confederate soldiers from Mississippi units
    Year: 1862
    John F Vaughn
    John F Vaughn
    Publication Number: M269
    NARA M269. Compiled service records of Confederate soldiers from Mississippi units
    Year: 1862
    John F Vaughn
    John F Vaughn
    Publication Number: M269
    NARA M269. Compiled service records of Confederate soldiers from Mississippi units
    Year: 1862
    John F Vaughn
    John F Vaughn
    Publication Number: M269
    NARA M269. Compiled service records of Confederate soldiers from Mississippi units
    Year: 1862
    John F Vaughn
Affidavit of Father, George W Vaughn
    John F Vaughn Affidavit of Father, George W Vaughn
    Publication Number: M269
    NARA M269. Compiled service records of Confederate soldiers from Mississippi units
    Year: 1862
    John F Vaughn
    John F Vaughn
    Publication Number: M269
    NARA M269. Compiled service records of Confederate soldiers from Mississippi units
    Year: 1862
    John F Vaughn
    John F Vaughn
    Publication Number: M269
    NARA M269. Compiled service records of Confederate soldiers from Mississippi units
    Year: 1862
    John F Vaughn
    John F Vaughn
    Publication Number: M269
    NARA M269. Compiled service records of Confederate soldiers from Mississippi units
    Year: 1862

    Headstones
    John Franklin Vaughn
    John Franklin Vaughn
    Okolona Confederate Cemetery, Okolona, Chickasaw Co., MS
    Status: Located

  • Notes 
    • http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=13190489 [1]
    • John Franklin Vaughn served in the 10th Regiment MS Volunteers. He enlisted on Feb 19, 1862 at Fulton, MS. Served under Captain Finely.

      He died at Okolona Hospital on or near April/May 1862.

      The affidavit of father, George Washington Vaughn details a date of death as April 23, 1862. The Roll Card card for May-June 1862 lists death as May 25, 1862.

      __________________________________

      State of Mississippi
      Tishomingo County

      On this 28th day of April 1863

      Before the subscriber, one of the Justices of the Peace in and for said County and State, personally
      appeared G.W. Vaughan and made oath on the Holy Evangelly of the Almighty God that he is the Father of J.F. Vaughan,
      deceased, who died April 23rd, 1862 (without any wife or children), a private of Capt. Finley's Company in Co. (F)
      10th Regt. Miss. Volunteers and that there has not been any administration, on the Estate of said dec'd and he is
      therefore entitled to the arrears of pay etc. that may be found due Said deceased from the Confederate States of
      America, and at the said time also appeared William Millican and M.V. Wilemon and made oath as aforesaid, that the
      facts as sworn to by the claimant are true to the best of their knowledge, and htat they are not interested therein.
      I do certify that said William Millican and W.V. Wilemon are credible witnesses, Sworn and Subscribed to before me,
      this 28th day of April 1863.

      G.S. Tardew GW Vaughan
      Justice of the Peace Wm Millican
      MV Wilemon [2]

    • HISTORY OF THE 10TH REGIMENT

      Aggregate original enrollment, 841 officers and men.

      The regiment was reorganized at Corinth, March 15, 1862, and reenlisted for two years.

      The companies that responded to the first call, March 1, 1861, for troops to serve twelve months at Pensacola, began to assemble at Mobile in that month, marched to Pensacola April 10-12, and encamped near Fort Barrancas, opposite Fort Pickens and Santa Rosa Island, held by Union troops. Twenty Mississippi companies having arrived, the Ninth and Tenth Regiments were organized, these numbers being assigned to follow the eight regiments in the State army. The Ninth and Tenth, however, were the first regiments organized and the first in the service of the Confederate States.

      General Bragg announced by order of April 17, 1861, that the Ninth and Tenth Regiments had been received (on 14th) in the service of the Confederate States. They were put under the brigade command of Colonel Chalmers. Lieutenant-Colonel J. R. Davis was in command at Fort McRee until May 20, when he was ordered to report at Montgomery and his place was taken by Major Gregory. Immediately after this Colonel Phillips died, and on May 28 the regiment elected Captain Robert A. Smith, of Jackson, Colonel. He was then twenty-five years of age. After some time on the staff of President Davis, Lieut-Col. Davis was promoted as Brigadier-General in the Army of Northern Virginia.

      The companies of Captains Barr, Fearn, Wade, Gibbes, Lipscomb, A, D, E, H and I, were assigned to duty as the garrison of Fort McRee, the works nearest Fort Pickens, where they were busied in fortification work, as well as supporting the gunners during the bombardments, for four months.

      A detachment from the Tenth formed part of the First Battalion of Gen. R. H. Anderson's expedition from Pensacola to Santa Rosa Island, October 9, 1861, and Surgeon Lipscomb was in the medical staff. Under the command of Colonel Chalmers the men marched several miles in the sand along the north beach and then into the middle of the Island, where they took part in the burning of the camp of the New York Zouaves. Among the wounded was Sergeant James P. Barksdale, Company G.

      Orders for transfer to the interior arrived February 23, when the regiment was in the confusion of re-enlistment and furlough. The command moved to Montgomery on the 27th, to Chattanooga by way of Atlanta early in March, thence to Eastport, Ala., to meet an anticipated advance of gunboats, and reached Corinth March 10, where the regiment was reorganized. It was assigned, March 9, to the brigade of Gen. J. R. Chalmers, the "High Pressure Brigade," composed of the Seventh and Ninth and Tenth Regiments, Baskerville's cavalry and the Vaiden battery, the Fifth Regiment being added before the battle of Shiloh. The brigade was in Withers' Division of Bragg's Corps.

      They moved April 1, as the advance force of Johnston's army, to Monterey, Tenn., whence they advanced on April 4 and 5 toward Grant's army. The Tenth led the brigade, and when the battle began, April 6, after the exchange of a few volleys, the Tenth, about 360 strong, led by its gallant Colonel, dashed up the hill in front and drove back the Eighteenth Wisconsin Regiment, of Prentiss' Division. Supported by the Ninth and Seventh, the three Mississippi regiments pushed back the whole Federal line in their front, through the camps and a half mile beyond. That day the regiment was in six encounters with the Federal forces, finally aiding in the capture of Prentiss' Division. "Col. R, A. Smith was particularly distinguished for his bold daring and his clarion voice could be heard above the din of battle cheering on his men," said Chalmers, who also gave honorable mention to James Barr and Lieut. M. M. Shelley, volunteer aides. Among the wounded were Lieutenants Ball and Conklin, Company G, The regiment fought with distinction also through the second day of the battle, retired with the brigade in the afternoon, and next day marched back to Corinth.

      Advancing again to Monterey April 10 the regiment had a skirmish at Mickey's Ridge, with a loss of 15 wounded and 25 captured. During the advance of the Federal army the regiment skirmished on the Farmington road April 20 and on the Purdy road April 26 and 30, and May 1 to 29 served on the fortified line around Corinth. [3]
    • In April, the new 10th, now under the command of Col. Robert A. Smith and numbering only 360 men, fought in the Battle of Shiloh in West Tennessee. It later participated in Braxton Bragg's Kentucky Campaign and suffered significant casualties at the Battle of Munfordville, including Colonel Smith. Chalmers' Brigade, including the 10th Mississippi, was part in the advance toward Louisville in September. Under Col. James Barr, Jr., the 10th fought in the Battle of Perryville before retreating with Bragg's beaten army across the Cumberland Gap on October 20. Marching through Tennessee, the regiment camped near Murfreesboro, Tennessee, in November. It fought in the subsequent Battle of Stones River in late December and early January 1863. [4]
    • During the Civil War a hospital was located at Okolona, Mississippi. The Rose Gates College Buildings were utilized as the main body for this hospital. The Presbyterian, Baptist and Methodist Churches, also the Female Seminary were converted into hospital wards. Many of the wounded from the battles of Shiloh, Corinth and Brice's Cross Roads were sent to Okolona, and the following list of the dead buried here has been carefully preserved.
      Roll of Confederate dead buried in the Soldiers' Cemetery, Okolona, Mississippi.

      Alabama 115
      Arkansas 49
      Florida 1
      Georgia 5
      Kentucky 12
      Louisiana 57
      Mississippi 74
      Missouri 7
      Tennessee 34
      Texas 49
      Unknown 318

  • Sources 
    1. [S139] Findagrave.com.

    2. [S406] NARA.

    3. [S407] http://mississippiscv.org/MS_Units/10th_MS_Inf.htm.

    4. [S126] Wikipedia.